Sunday, November 23, 2014

HOW TO COOK PANCIT ESTACION (RECIPE)

HOW TO COOK PANCIT ESTACION (RECIPE) -this dish is originated in the town of Tanza, province of Cavite somewhere in southern part of the main Island of Luzon in the Philippines. Although this dish is not made of noodles which is commonly used in making pancit, it is still called pancit because the main ingredients used which is the togue looks like some sort of noodles and also the sauce used is very similar to the one used in making palabok. The name Estacion is a Spanish term for Station. It is believed that this dish was first sold in a train station in Cavite so that is why it is named that way. Pancit Estacion is one of the famous products of Cavite and many tourists do not miss the chance of eating it whenever they visit the province. Many food shops and food carts sell this dish for very low prices and many variations are offered in many restaurants not only in Cavite but also in greater Manila area. Here is the recipe:



HOW TO COOK PANCIT ESTACION (RECIPE)

Cook Time: 10 minutes
Yield: 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

2 cups crushed roasted peanut
2 cups crushed pork cracklings
1/4 cup minced garlic
2 onions (minced)
2 cups water
2 cups fried fish flakes
1 kilo mungbean sprout (togue)
fish sauce to taste
2 tablespoon achuete (soaked in 1 cup water)
2 cups flour (dissolved in 4 cups water
3 eggs whisked
15 pieces kamias (cut crosswise thinly)
cooking oil


1. In a skillet, saute garlic and onion until light brown.
2. Add 2 cups water, flour mixture, achuete water, fish sauce and eggs. Stir thoroughly until thickens.
3. In a pot, boil water. Add togue and simmer for 3-4 minutes.
4. Remove the togue from the water and transfer in individual serving plates.
5. Pour sauce over the togue. Garnish with crushed peanut, cracklings, fried fish flakes, and kamias.
6. Serve and enjoy!

HOW TO COOK PANCIT ESTACION (RECIPE)

Saturday, November 22, 2014

HOW TO COOK SINANGLAW (RECIPE)

HOW TO COOK SINANGLAW (RECIPE) -this is a native dish in Ilocos region in the Philippines. It is made of beef innards and sometimes with cow's face and ears. This dish is similar to pinapaitan because they both have innards and bile extract in the ingredients. Sinanglaw is commonly cooked as hot and spicy soup that is why this dish is one of the best sellers during rainy reason and also during the months of November to February because those months are the coldest season in the Philippines. Not all the markets sell innards so if you are having a hard time searching for it in your town, do not worry because you can replace the innards with just your favorite meat. And also if you can not find bile extract, you can use bitter gourd. Sinanglaw is also cooked as sour soup and the good news here is that you can use almost any sour ingredients like, kamias, tamarind fruit or tamarind leaves, vinegar, etc. If you are a traveler and happen to visit the norther part of the country, Sinanglaw is very abundant that you can have it in any local eateries. If you do not eat blood like myself, I would like to advise you to ask the waiters if the sinanglaw they serve has blood in it. It is better to ask because sometimes it is hard to distinguish the blood from liver. Here is the recipe:



HOW TO COOK SINANGLAW (RECIPE)

INGREDIENTS
1/2 kilo cow innards (chopped into small cubes)
2 tablespoon bile extract (or 1 cup chopped bitter gourd)
1 thumb-size ginger (thinly sliced)
5 cloves garlic (minced)
1 medium size onion (thinly sliced)
5 pieces kamias, sliced (or 3/4 cup white vinegar)
cooking oil
5 pieces green chili (siling panigang)
salt to taste

STEP BY STEP COOKING PROCEDURE AND DIRECTIONS
1. In a pot, boil water. Add the innards. Simmer for half an hour or longer depending on how tender the meat is. Remove the scum when boiling.
2. Separate the innards from broth and set aside.
3. In a skillet, heat oil. Saute ginger, onion and garlic.
4. Add the innards and bile extract and saute for another 2 minutes.
5. Add the broth (or 6 cups of water if you don't want to use the broth) and simmer for half an hour then add the vinegar, salt and green chili. Continue simmering for another 10 minutes.
6. When simmering, the fats and cholesterol will emerge. Scoop them because those are not healthy to eat.
7. Remove from heat, transfer in the serving bowls and serve while hot.

HOW TO COOK SINANGLAW (RECIPE)

Friday, November 21, 2014

HOW TO COOK ESTOFADO (RECIPE)

HOW TO COOK ESTOFADO (RECIPE) -Stofado is a Filipino dish made of pork that has many variations. The most common is the sweet and chewy one. The meat is cooked with soy sauce and sugar but not necessarily cooked the way the adobo is. In the Philippines, this dish is commonly served as appetizer but can be the main course served with rice. Some versions use plantain banana for the ingredients to add sweetness to the dish. Estofado originated in Spain but since the Philippines was a colony of Spain for 300 years, this dish has evolved into many variations that it has even become traditional because this dish is always present whenever there are occasions in the country like weddings, baptismal, birthdays and family reunions. To me, this dish is like a combination of Patatim, Pochero and adobo and I could taste the three dishes when I am eating Estofado. I would not recommend this dish to anyone who has high blood pressure though because this dish is too fatty for them, we do not want anyone to end up in the hospital after eating it. In this recipe I am going to share with you, we are going to use pork fats but you can replace it. Here is the recipe:

                               image source: wikipedia.org


HOW TO COOK ESTOFADO (RECIPE)

INGREDIENTS FOR ESTOFADO
1/2 kilo pork fats with skin (sliced into strips)
1/2 cup low sodium soy sauce
4 tablespoon vinegar
6 cloves garlic (minced)
4 teaspoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 large size red onion (sliced thinly)
8 tablespoon tomato sauce
1 cup pimiento (cut into thin strips)
5 plantain banana or saba (cut into halves and fried)
cooking oil

STEP BY STEP COOKING PROCEDURE
1. In a large mixing bowl, combine together all the ingredients except oil, tomato sauce, pimiento and plantain banana.
2. Mix well until the sugar is dissolved.
3. Cover the bowl, refrigerate and marinade for 3 hours.
4. Remove the pork from marinade and set aside.
5. In a frying pan, heat oil. Fry the pork until browned.
6. Remove the excess oil from the pan. Pour marinade.
7. Add 1/2 cup of water and bring to a boil. When boiling, lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
8. Add tomato sauce and pimiento and continue simmering for another 5 minutes.
9. Transfer to serving dish and serve with fried plantain banana.

HOW TO COOK ESTOFADO (RECIPE)

Thursday, November 20, 2014

HOW TO MAKE HAMONADO (RECIPE)

HOW TO MAKE HAMONADO (RECIPE) -Hamonado is a traditional dish in the Philippines that is always cooked during christmas and new year. This food is made of pork or roasted pig which is processed to be more like Ham. Hamonado is the best alternative for ham when you feel like you do not want ham. One of the few differences between ham and hamonado is that ham is a bit more salty than this dish. And also hamonado is added with ingredients for it to be become a little sweet and sour like pineapple and calamansi extract. Basically, this dish is marinated in a mixture of pineapple juice and calamansi but what we are going to do using my recipe is we are going to use lemon extract instead of the traditional calamansi extract because lemon is more abundant globally than calamansi. But I think any citrus fruit will do as long as it possesses the taste we need for this dish. Making Hamonado is very simple and easier than you think but it will require more time and a bit of patience because this dish requires curing. This time we also need to fry the pork to keep the taste of marinade in the pork. There are many ways to make Hamonado like baking it together with the sweet and sour ingredients but I find that curing, frying and simmering it is the best. To me, this food is way better than ham, maybe it is because I like sweet and sour food like this one or maybe it is just easier for me to make Hamonda than making ham. You can adjust the amount of the ingredients in my recipe to suit your taste or you can replace some of it with your preferred ones but if you are going to experiment first, I would like to advise you to just experiment using small amount of the whole ingredients because you would not be so sure if you would like the outcome of you experiment. Here is the recipe for Hamonado:


                                image source: muntingtinigngpateros.blogspot.com

HOW TO MAKE HAMONADO (RECIPE)

Prep Time:
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 7 servings

INGREDIENTS FOR HAMONADO
3/4 kilo pork tenderloin
2 cups pineapple chunks
2 cups pineapple juice
5 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup lemon extract
4 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce
cooking oil
freshly ground pepper to taste
salt to taste

DIRECTIONS AND PROCEDURE ON MAKING HAMONADO
1. In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients except pineapple chunks and cooking oil. Mix until sugar and salt are dissolved.
2. Cover the bowl and marinade the pork overnight in a fridge.
3. Remove the pork from the marinade. Set the marinade aside.
4. In a skillet, heat oil. Fry the pork until cooked or browned.
5. Pour the marinade, bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
6. Add the pineapple chunks and continue simmer for another 5 minutes or until the marinade sauce thickens.
7. Remove from heat, slice into 7 parts.
8. Transfer in serving plates and serve with red wine.

HOW TO MAKE HAMONADO (RECIPE)

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

HOW TO MAKE MYEOLCHI BOKKEUM (RECIPE)

HOW TO MAKE MYEOLCHI BOKKEUM (RECIPE) -Myeolchi Bokkeum is large amount to preserve so that this dish is always available and ready the time they are having their meals. Sometimes this dish  is kept in a fridge for a long time that it can even stay good for weeks even month. The secret to making Myeolchi Bokkeum to preserve is the saltiness. Its taste is good even it is salty because the sweetness of this dish compliments the saltiness. Another good thing about this food is that it can be served without the need for reheating. In tropical countries, this side dish is good for lunch because it gives refreshment when it is eaten right out of fridge. What I am going to share with you is the simple and easy way to make Myeolchi Bokkeum.


                                image source: wikipedia.org
HOW TO MAKE MYEOLCHI BOKKEUM (RECIPE)

Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 9 minutes
Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients:
2 cups anchovies (dried)
1 tablespoon oil
1 small size bell pepper (cut into strips)

3 teaspoon low sodium soy sauce
2 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 teaspoon rice wine
1 teaspoon sesame seeds (toasted)

Preparation and procedure:
1. In a pan, heat oil, saute anchovies and bell pepper.
2. In a saucepan, combine together soy sauce, honey, sesame oil, rice wine and sesame seeds. Stir and bring to a boil slowly.
3. In the pan, combine together the sauce and anchovy mixture and saute for 3 minutes.
4. Let rest and cool down. Transfer in a container and refrigerate.

HOW TO MAKE MYEOLCHI BOKKEUM (RECIPE)

Labels

aachener printen (1) adobo recipes (1) adobong baboy sa gata (pork adobo in coconut milk) (1) adobong kangkong (1) adobong manok (1) adobong sitaw (2) afritada images (1) afritadang manok (1) arroz caldo (2) asian recipes (38) ba-wan (1) baked dishes (1) baked macaroni recipe (1) banana bread (1) banana cue (2) bangers and mash (1) batchoy (1) bayerische creme (1) beef asado (asadong baka) (1) beef caldereta (1) beef nilaga (1) beef recipes (13) beef stew recipe (2) beef teriyaki (1) beverages (3) bicol express (2) bicol express images (1) biko (1) bistek (1) bopis (1) bopis images (1) bopis recipe (1) bratkartoffeln (1) bratwurst (1) bread (1) buchteln (1) buco (1) buffalo wings (1) bukayo (1) buko pandan salad (1) buko salad images (1) bulalo (1) bulalo images (1) bulalo recipe (1) bulalong baka (1) buletten (1) burger recipes (1) cake recipes (1) cakes breads and cookies recipes (7) calabasa (1) caldereta (1) caldereta images (1) caldereta recipe (1) calderetang kambing (goat's meat caldereta) (1) camote cue (2) canadian poutine (1) canton (1) chaibo neng (1) champorado (1) chao fan recipe (1) chicken (2) chicken adobo (1) chicken afritada (1) chicken asado (asadong manok) (1) chicken caldereta (1) chicken fettucine alfredo (1) chicken marsala (1) chicken noodle soup (1) chicken recipes (17) chicken sisig (1) chicken teriyaki (1) chicken tinola recipe (1) chicken tocino (1) chili crab recipe (1) chop suey (1) cladereta images (1) coated french fries recipe (1) coco jam (1) condiment recipes (1) crab (1) crispy pata (1) cucumber (1) currywurst (1) dachang bao xiaochang (1) daing na pusit (1) dampfnudeln (1) dan zai (1) desserts (4) diningding (1) diningding na labong at saluyot (1) dried squid (1) dried tofu (1) duck caldereta (calderetang bibe) (1) dumpling (3) easy adobong pusit squid (1) egg drop soup (1) egg recipes (3) eierkuchen (1) escabecheng bangus (1) escabecheng galunggong (1) exotic dish recipes (1) filipino recipes (63) fish and seafood recipes (27) fish tacos recipe (1) flädlesuppe (1) french onion soup recipe (1) french recipes (3) french toast (1) fusion chocolate fondue (1) gaisburger marsch (1) garlic and beans soup (1) german (19) ginataan recipes (2) ginataang langka (1) ginataang sitaw at kalabasa (1) ginisang gulay (1) ginisang gulay images (1) ginisang monggo (munggo) (1) ginisang tahong (1) gongwan (1) goto (1) gourmet peking duck (1) grilled (1) gruenkohl (1) hackepeter (1) halibut casserole (1) hasenpfeffer (1) hibachi chicken (1) hibachi recipes (1) hibachi shrimp (1) houji rou fan (1) how to bake pancakes (1) how to cook (2) how to cook french onion soup (1) how to cook lechon kawali (1) how to make coated french fries (1) how to make fish tacos (1) how to make pichi-pichi (1) inasal (1) innards (1) japanese recipes (3) kaesespaetzle (1) kakanin (1) kalderetang baboy (1) kalderetang manok (1) kartoffelsalat (1) kilawing baboy (1) kimbap (1) knodel (1) kohlrouladen (1) konigsberger klopse (1) korean (16) kung pao (2) kwek-kwek (1) laing (1) laing recipe (1) lasagna (1) leberkäse (1) leche flan (1) lechon kawali recipe (1) liquor (1) lo ba bung baboy (1) mackerel (1) marj morning combo (1) mashed potatoes (1) meat (3) meatballs (1) meatballs teriyaki (1) mett brotchen (1) millet cake (1) mushroom soup (1) mushu pork (1) nilagang baka (1) noodle recipes (6) noodles (2) okoy (1) orange chicken (1) oyster omelet (1) oyster vermicelli (1) paksiw images (1) paksiw na bangus (1) paksiw na pata (1) palabok (1) palitaw (1) pancit (4) pancit lug-lug (1) pansit (1) pasta recipes (6) pastries (1) patatim (1) pellkartoffeln (1) pfannkuchen (1) pfefferpotthast (1) pichelsteiner (1) pickles (1) pinakbet ilocano style (1) pinakbet tagalog style (1) pineapple chicken (1) pininyahang manok (1) pininyahang manok images (1) pininyahang manok recipe (1) pocherong manok (1) polvoron (pulburon) (1) pork (3) pork adobo with potatoes (adobong baboy) (1) pork caldereta (1) pork igado (1) pork insarabasab (1) pork kebab (1) pork meatballs (bola-bolang baboy (1) pork menudo (1) pork recipes (22) pork sinigang (1) pork sinigang (sinigang na baboy sa sampalok (1) pork stew (1) pork teriyaki (1) pork tocino (1) pork tofu (1) porridge (1) prinzregententorte (1) puso ng saging ukoy (1) raw dishes (1) recipe blog (1) rellenong bangus (1) rellenong bangus images (1) relyenong bangus recipe (1) rice (1) rouladen (1) salad recipes (1) sanbeiji (1) sauerbraten (1) sauerkraut (1) schupfnudeln (1) schweinsbraten (1) schweinshaxe (1) sesame chicken (1) simple chicken balti (1) sinampalukang baboy (1) sinampalukang manok (1) sinbawang tahong (1) sinigang na bagus sa miso (1) siomai (1) sisig (1) snack (1) snack recipes (3) soup recipes (7) spaghetti (1) spaghetti bolognese (1) spaghetti pasta carbonara (1) spatzle (1) special tortang talong (1) spicy (2) spring rolls (1) springerle (1) squid geng (1) stew recipes (3) stir fried vegetables (1) stollen (1) sun cakes (1) sweet and sour (1) szechuan chicken (1) taiwanese (1) tinola images (1) tinolang manok (1) tokneneng (1) tokwa't baboy (1) topfenstrudel (1) ukoy (3) vegetable recipes (16) vegetarian (1) weihnachtsgans (1) weisn hendl (1) wibele (1) won ton soup (1) yi mian (1) zwiebelkuchen (1)

FeedBurner FeedCount

Followers

NETWORKEDBLOGS